Archive for the ‘Karsnice’ Category

May Days – Spoilt for choice

Saturday, 28 April 2012

But not everyone is celebrating!

Chabowka Tkt48-191 at the 2010 Wolsztyn Parade. Photo BTWT.

(Click to enlarge.)

With so much going on during the Majowka (May Days) week for narrow gauge enthusiasts, it is only fair that BTWT should also cover some of the standard gauge attractions as well. When we look at something we look under the carpet as well, so be prepared for some critical comments!

Wolsztyn 28 – 29 April

The May festivities start with today’s annual Wolsztyn Steam Locomotive Parade. This is the biggest event of this kind in Poland and is attended by some 30,000 people. One would think that, with so many visitors coming from outside the area, the burghers of Wolsztyn would be enthusiastic supporters of the event. True, Wolsztyn Council does provide the security guards, but that is all.

How wonderful it would be to have some sponsorship from the town towards the costs of running steam specials from Warsaw and Wroclaw connecting with the event. (There is a special train from Wroclaw, but it is not steam-hauled; and one steam-hauled service from Poznan.)

The Council members appear to regard Parada Parowzow as a side show to their Dni Wolsztyna (Wolsztyn Days). They put on pop concerts, a sailing regatta, fishing competitions and support events put on by local schools. A couple of years ago the Mayor of Wolsztyn was overheard by one of our friends listing the attractions of Wolsztyn at a tourism promotion event in Warsaw. Not once did he mention the Steam Depot, the Steam Locomotive Parade or the steam-hauled trains to Poznan!

If today’s huge crowds, steam engines charging up and down a short piece of track and a light show are not your cup of tea, why not go to Wolsztyn tomorrow? The crowds and overseas steam locomotives will have gone, but there will be steam trains running from Wolsztyn to Stefanowo and Rakonowice and a chance to see Chabowka’s Tkt48-91 doing some useful work.

At the end of each year’s Parada Parowozow the same question is asked, Will there be another parade next year? And each year the answer is the same, With PKP Cargo on the verge of privatisation and with Wolsztyn Town Council being so laid back about their steam shed and steam trains, who knows?

Jaworzyna Slask – 28 April – 6 May

The Industry and Railways Museum at the old Jaworzyna Slask steam depot is running special attractions during the whole week. There will be conducted tours of the museum and its collection. Demonstrations of the turntable, a chance to ride in vintage coaches, and from 1 May a chance for a cab ride in the museum’s Tkt48-18.

The management of Jaworzyna Slask is not loved by the Polish railway enthusiast community. Some difficult decisions had to be made at the start of the museum’s existence, not dissimilar to the Festiniog Railway’s scrapping Moel Tryfan in 1954.

Whatever the rights and wrongs of the affair, today the museum’s collection looks superb, Tkt48-18 (thanks to the generosity of Wolsztyn Experience) is in working order, and the museum’s approach to its paying visitors is 100% professional.

Koscierzyna – 2 May

Koscierzyna is one ex PKP Skasen that nearly got away. Its rescue is largely due to the efforts of Miroslaw Szymanski, the former Chief Executive of Fundacja Era Parowozow who lobbied tirelessly for its takeover by the local council.

The museum is open every day, on 2 May the Skansen celebrates its 20th birthday and entry will be free. There will be a railway themed concert and the unveiling of a statue commissioned by the council celebrating the line of 18° latitude. One wonders why the council could not have commissioned the restoration of a particular item or rolling stock instead?

Skierniewice – 5 May

The Polskie Stowarzyszenie Milosnikow Kolejowych (Polish Railway Enthusiasts Association) are holding an open day at Skierniewice on 5 May. The amazing collection of railway rolling stock at Skierniewice deserves to be better known outside Poland and this is one event which we would enthusiastically endorse with no reservations.

We do have one question which though we have asked the PSMK authorities several times has not been satisfactorily answered. Why – given the society’s very visible need for money – don’t they charge admission to their open days and raise income from ancillary activities like selling guides and refreshments? Or are they afraid that if they do the local council will turn round and hit them with local taxes levied at commercial rates?

Those not celebrating!

Chabowka

Amazingly, with a permanent staff of some 8 people, some 6 locomotives in working order and a full time official responsible for marketing, the Chabowka skansen  is not putting on anything special during the May Days holiday. It is true that the skansen despatched Tkt48-191 to Wolsztyn with a couple of coaches and its also true that Chabowka put on the annual Parowozjada steam gala in August, but given the resources devoted to the skansen we find it incredible that no attractions – however modest – are being put on during this period.

Just to show what the skansen team are capable of – when they put their mind to it – the official web pages boast that on 31 March a private freight train was run at the behest of a – presumably wealthy – German enthusiast from Chabowka to Nowy Sacz along this disused line.

We have long admired the engineering expertise of the technical team at Chabowka and their achievement in keeping so many engines in working order with minimum resources. It is a great pity that the people responsible for marketing the skansen do not have the same ‘can do’ attitude.

Karsnice

Images of Karsnice. Video by .

The Karsnice skansen is a very sad case. It was started by the manager of the railway workshops there in 1989 and a sizeable collection of locomotives and railway rolling stock was built up. His plan was to transfer the collection to a special trust, but he received early retirement (and a reduced pension!) before the trust could be set up.

When he left the Karsnice workshops the collection was left in limbo and then PKP’s real estate department, PKP Nieruchomosci, started selling the exhibits. One Ty2 went to the Lodz holocaust museum a couple of other locos were sold to the PSMK at Skierniewice.

A ‘Save Our Skansen’ campaign was run by the neighbouring town of Zdunska Wola and some leverage at ministerial level was provided by some international friends. Officially the skansen was repreived. The rolling stock and the land it stood on was transferred to the Zdunska Wola Town Council.

The council managed to raise some funds and obtain an EU grant to cosmetically restore some of the rolling stock. But Nieruchomosci transferred only the bare minimum parcel of land. The shed where the Karsnice vintage train of wooden four wheel carriages was not included. This great video by Lukasz Szyczyk shows the tragic result.

Elk

Sadly, the orphaned skansen here never found a local council ready to take it over with devastating results. Now Nieruchomosci are auctioning the surviving Ol49-80 and the remaining workshop equipment.

Wegerzewo – Ketrzyn railway line

This was Poland’s only ‘preserved’ standard gauge railway line. It was saved by the Stowarzyszenie Hobbystow Kolejowych (Society of Railway Enthusiasts) who persuaded the local council to take the line over.

There was a flurry of activity here in 2008 since then nothing!

Pyskowice

The threat of court action continues to hang over the skansen. There was a court hearing last week which was immediately suspended because key PKP witnesses had not attended. The next session will take place on July 10. Till the matter is resolved the Skansen remains closed. More BTWT readers are needed to assist with the lobbying effort that is going on behind the scenes. Please get in touch if you would like to help.

Skierniewice or Naleczow or both?

So where to go next week? It has been a while since I visited the Skiernievice Skansen so the open day there is a big temptation, but Gregorz Sykut writes that the Stowarzyszenie na Rzecz Rozwoju Nadwislanskiej Kolei Wąskotorowej (Association for the Development of the Nadwislanska Narrow Gauge Railway) is running a special train followed by a film show at Karczmiska station.

The train, film show and car parking are free. The start is at 5.30 PM and the Society have a plan to finish at 9:30 PM. At the station there will be an  opportunity to purchase a meal from the grill and drinks. More details from: gsykut@gmail.com.

Hmm, narrow or standard gauge? Naleczow is not all that far from Skierniewice… it would be great to visit both!

Dyspozytor

A Return Journey – Part 14

Thursday, 15 March 2012

by Robert Hall

The final part of Robert Hall’s story of his return to Poland after 16 years

Robert Hall’s route from Radom to Lodz Fabryczna. Map courtesy Railmap.

(Click on the image to enlarge, but click on this link, if you want to follow Robert’s journey station by station on a larger scale Railmap which can be zoomed and scrolled.)

After a night in an agreeable hotel in Radom, only a couple of minutes’ walk from the station, I set off to Lodz the following morning, Monday 26 July. Armed with a packed breakfast provided by the hotel, I caught the 07:27 through local train Radom – Tomaszow Mazowiecki – Lodz. At the time, this was the only through westbound train of the day; it had an eastbound counterpart which ran in the evening. There is a meagre selection of other trains on the line, but no other trains run the full length.

The EMU departed punctually, for a delightful early-morning, all-stations run through pleasant countryside. Whilst passenger workings on this route may be few and far between, in the course of the journey we did pass a number of long-distance freights, and I noticed timber being loaded into PKP Cargo wagons at Wykno. It was cheering to see these all rail freight activities after my experiences on other secondary lines during this visit to Poland.

EMUs at Lodz Fabryczna shortly before closure. Photo Wiktor Baron.

(Click image to enlarge. Click on this link to see original on Wikipedia and for details of licensing.)

I arrived at Lodz Fabryczna station at 10:41, where  Dyspozytor and his car were waiting. A fine coup had been achieved: we were off to Zdunska Wola some 40 km to the west, and neighbouring Karsznice, for a visit to the little-known standard-gauge ‘skansen’ (open air museum) at the latter location. The railway museum, formerly under PKP control, has only recently been transferred to the Zdunska Wola municipality.

Our first stop was the Zdunska Wola Museum in the centre of town. The railway museum for administration purposes is now part of the town museum. We were met by the town’s museum director, under whose remit the railway museum now falls.

We were given a tour of this most interesting museum which tell the history of this textile town which is something of a junior partner of Lodz, and then, with Piotr Skorek of the Zdunska Wola museum staff as our guide, we continued to the railway museum at Karsznice, a few kilometres to the South.

The Karsnice ‘skansen’ in 2006. Photo BTWT.

(Click on image to enlarge.)

Until recently the railway museum was an integral part of Karsznice loco depot and railway workshops. Karsznice is a railway town, built for the Magistrala Weglowa (Upper Silesia – Gdynia coal railway) in the 1930s. It was a convenient point for exchanges of locos and crews, on the long run between the coal mines and the seaport.

It was a great privilege to see round Karsznice railway museum, which at the time of my visit was not open to the public at all; its Skierniewice counterpart can at least be visited a few days in the year. The previous workshop manager  had set out to collect one example of each of the engines that used to work on the coal line and was one engine short when he received his redundancy notice.

I spotted five out of the seven standard-gauge steam classes which were still active in the 1980s. The exceptions were class TKt48 2-8-2T, and class Ty51 2-10-0, and plentiful examples of both clases are preserved elsewhere. There was also Ty23-237, a Polish ‘home-grown’ 2-10-0 freight hauler. A few specimens of this class were active on PKP till the late 1970s.

Also still in use in the late 1970s, were the massive American-built class Ty246 2-10-0, fitted with a mechanical stoker. These were built to make good World War II losses in the brief time-window before it all went nasty between the West and the Soviet Union. I understand that some features of class Ty246 were used in the design of the later Ty51. Besides the steam locomotives there were also an assortment of diesel locos and railcars, and passenger stock, some of considerable antiquity.

Most unfortunately, there is at present no alternative to all these exhibits being kept permanently out in the open air. In addition, the museum’s future is entirely in the hands of the local council, who are at present supportive but there is no guarantee that this attitude will continue indefinitely, or even for long, given the situations faced by other Polish rail heritage assets in local authority care.

We drove back to Lodz via country roads with a coffee-and-ice-cream stop in a little town en route. You can’t cover everything – it turned out that something had to give, and the victim was Lodz’s wonderful metre-gauge tram system. In the end, time didn’t allow us to do the epic interurban run north to Ozorkow. So I was not able to enjoy as much of the Lodz tram network as planned, but those fragments I did experience were cherished. A great inducement for another visit to Poland.

The start of the interurban line to Konstantynow and Lutomersk at Zdrowie. The Lodz MPK trams turn right here and go round a loop. Note the Tramwaje Podmiejskie logo on the tram. Photo BTWT.

(Click image to enlarge.)

I did see a fair amount of the interurban tram line to Lutomiersk (featured in ‘A return journey – part 3‘) which is shorter than the Ozorkow line, but no small-time spur. At the time of my visit, the Lutomiersk tram route was temporarily interrupted over the central stretch near Konstantynow while road works were being carried out. Buses were bridging the gap, something of a discouragement to travel.

We travelled alongside the line for some distance by car, on journeys on two different days. On the journey to Zbiersk on July 19th we examined the route’s end, a loop in Lutomiersk town square. During our journey to Zdunska Wola on the 26th we also followed part of the line, and made a call at the interurban route’s depot on the west side of Lodz.

We had a chat and a coffee with the hospitable general manager and had a walk round the depot under the guidance of the chief engineer. At the depot we saw service vehicles of very considerable antiquity, converted from tramcars.

On the way back from Zdunska Wola and Karsznice, we planned our route so as to hit the main road west of Aleksandrow Lodzki, whose municipality a few years ago foolishly voted to abolish their tram route to Lodz, on a separate formation parallel to the main road, and replace it with buses. The result was road traffic chaos, which might hopefully serve as an object lesson to other commuter towns around Lodz about the wisdom of keeping their trams…

And so dawned Tuesday 27th, my last day in Poland. For complicated reasons, I had arrived in Poznan by air, but departed by rail. I had a few hours left for a farewell trip before my train in the evening. Having developed a fondness for leisurely journeys along electric lines by local EMU, I decided on a local-EMU odyssey as a fitting farewell to Poland, so I took a tram to Lodz Kaliszka station, and left Lodz on the 13:33 EMU, arriving in Poznan Glowny at 18:45, in plenty of time for the westbound night express due out of Poznan at 21:33.

The local EMUs seem basically ageless and unchanging, the same now as they were in 1980, and give a fairly comfortable ride. Who cares if it takes many hours of watching the beguiling Polish rural scene out of the window to arrive at one’s destination? Lines important enough to have been electrified also seem to have more action happening on them, including freight, than the depressing and seemingly dying non-electrified lines.

I enjoyed the long-distance EMU run. The train reversed in a leisurely fashion with a long lay-over at Ostrow Wielkopolski. A tank engine, 2-6-0T TKi3-120, was plinthed on the platform there. Pleszew was next. SKPL’s passenger service on this line was suspended for the summer, but I looked out eagerly for the 750mm gauge track, having a vague memory of seeing it in passing twenty years previously, but saw none this time.

Some way further north, Ol49-1 was plinthed at Jarocin, appropriately as Jarocin was the last place in Poland (with the exception of Wolsztyn) with completely genuine steam workings, until early 1992, mostly with class Ol49. At Sroda I was dozing, so missed a potential glimpse of the still-active 750mm gauge line.

And so I arrived in Poznan with time to get things straight, have a bite to eat, and prepare to board the Jan Kiepura express to the west, the first leg of my homeward journey. I was to leave the Jan Kiepura at Köln, and the journey until the far west of Germany was in darkness. I confess to being someone who lives firmly in the past, taking not much pleasure or interest in the ultra-modern railway scene. For me, even the Channel Tunnel, through which I have travelled several times, is a convenience rather than a thing of joy.

The Kiepura arrived at Poznan punctually, having started its run in Warsaw. It is designated, impressively, a ‘Hotel’ train, and its spacious accommodation, even in second class, certainly felt hotel-like after a long diet of Polish local trains with their comfortable enough but not overly expansive seating (and, as for the narrow gauge, comfort is not the object of that exercise). The reservation, obtained when booking the ticket in Britain a month previously, worked like a charm, and departure was punctual at 21:33.

With a long and quite intensive grice having taken its toll, I slept most of the night, completely unaware of the Polish-German border, and woke up briefly only at the key points of Berlin, Hannover, Hamm, and Essen. I had something over an hour in Köln, awaiting my train on to Brussels – an opportunity for some breakfast.

My Brussels train, coming in from further afield, was formed of highly modern and thoroughly comfortable stock. As at Poznan, the seat-reservation had worked smoothly, but my heart sank when an announcement was made that departure would be delayed because of a coupling-related fault on the train. My connection with Eurostar at Brussels was a little tight, and being given to travel-related panic, my imagination went into overdrive regarding what is done with passengers who miss their booked Eurostar because of the late running of their preceding train. The coupling fault was quite promptly remedied, and we set off about a quarter of an hour late. All being well, the Brussels connection would still be okay.

Shortly after Aachen, a change in the style of station-signage revealed that we had crossed into Belgium. I had hoped for some nice hill scenery in this far-eastern part of Belgium, but nowadays a great deal of the run between Aachen and Liege is in tunnel. Interchange to Eurostar at Brussels Midi was accompanied with check-in procedures identical to an airport, and after boarding the Eurostar, departure for London St. Pancras via Lille was punctual.

After a journey through unexciting scenery then through the ‘big rat-hole’, arrival was at about half past noon, my first time arriving by Eurostar into St Pancras, as the last time I had travelled by Eurostar the terminus had still been at Waterloo. With a short walk to Euston, the next train to Birmingham New Street, and a suburban train to my local station, I reached home. It had taken six trains and 24-plus-a-few hours, to get from Lodz Kaliska to Chester Road on the Birmingham – Lichfield line, with electric traction all the way.

My very great thanks to Dyspozytor for everything he had done to welcome me and to open doors to places which on my own I would have had no chance of accessing. I had a wonderful fortnight-and-a-bit. I had feared that the Poland of 2010 would be a miserable come-down, compared to the Poland that I had last experienced 16 years ago. I need not have worried, though my reservations were proved true in a couple of respects, in the main I am pleased to report that I found the country as much a delight as ever before. I want to go back – all that’s needed is a lottery win…

Film competition – part 10

Sunday, 9 October 2011

Ty23-299. A clip from Wezel by K. Karabasz.

The new fast bowler posed difficulties for our BTWT batsmen, none of whom managed to score during the last over. Gavin Whitelaw and Mark Judd both made brave attempts to play the ball, but – as no runs were scored – the point goes to Dyspozytor. The locomotive shown in our previous clip also caused a little puzzlement. It is Ty23-299, a pre-WWII 2-10-0.

The Ty23’s were the first Polish-designed heavy freight locomotives built for newly independent Poland. In 1923, Poland’s steam locomotive construction facilities were still being created, so the designer of the Ty23, Waclaw Lopuszynski, completed the detailed design work on the engine at the Schwartzkopff works in Berlin (BMAG). Schwartzkopff built the first 15 of the class (Ty23-1 to Ty23-15) and probably thought that they were home and dry to get the order to build the remaining locomotives of the first batch, which were needed urgently.

In the event, PKP went out to tender and the order was won by three Belgian companies. The builders of the next 60 engines were as follows: Cockerill, 26 engines, Ty23-16 – 41; St. Leonard, 19 engines, Ty23-42 – 60; and Franco-Belge, 15 engines, Ty23-61 – 75. The rest of the class were built in Poland: 164 engines by HCP, the H. Ciegielski works in Poznan, (1926 – 1932); 266 engines by WSABP, the Warsaw Steam Locomotive Construction Company (1927 – 1934); and 106 engines by Fablok, the First Locomotive Works in Crzanow (1929 – 1931).

Altogether 612 members of the class were built and they continued to be the basic Polish heavy freight locomotive fleet until 1937 when construction commenced of a more powerful 2-10-0, the Ty37. WWII dispersed the fleet among Germany and the Soviet Union. After the war, PKP was able to recover 312 locomotives.

Freight Yard at Tarnowskie Gory. Satellite photo Google Maps.

Three Ty23 locomotives survive ‘in preservation’, none in working order: Ty23-104 (HCP) in Chabowka; Ty23-145 (WSABP) in Jaworzyna Slask; and Ty23-273 (WSABP), rebuilt as a broad gauge locomotive, in Karsnice.

Wezel (Junction) – a short documentary film about the freight yard at Tarnowskie Gory – gives a rare insight into the inner workings of PKP in 1961. Each day the yard made up 200 freight trains, consisting of 7,500 goods wagons and carrying some 180,000 tonnes. Remarkably the freight yard continues in operation to this day.

Another metro still, but from which film?

Today’s still comes from a clip which takes a lingering look at an underground train. Who will be the first to identify the film?

More:

  • Parowozy w Polsce – Ty23

Karsnice, the forgotten skansen awakes

Monday, 29 November 2010

SM41-175, Bo ‘Bo’ Ganz-Mavag diesel electric before repainting. Photo ©Robert Dylewski.

Karsnice – the forgotten skansen – slowly awakes. Few English gricers make it to Karsnice, but if you like big engines it is still one of the most interesting PKP ‘skansens’. The collection of historic rolling stock at Karsnice was the personal initiative of the Karsnice Railway Works foreman, Marian Fiolek. He set himself the task of collecting one engine of every class that ever worked the Gynia – Katowice ‘trunk coal line’ which is served by the works.

SM41-175, cosmetic restoration complete. Photo ©Robert Dylewski.

In time he added other exotica to his collection – an ex USA army crane, a portable steam engine, the original coaches from the Gubalowka funicular railway in Zakopane, and a model railway. In 1993, the Karsnice Works celebrated their 60th anniversary and the skansen received its gala opening.


Ty43-1 under treatment. In Poland restoration starts with the tender. Photo ©Robert Dylewski.

Marian Fiolek had hoped that the town of Zdunska Wola would take over the ‘skansen’ and that the Karsnice railwayman’s association would take on responsibility for looking after the rolling stock. But he was unable to personally guide his plans to fruition. He was still one locomotive short from completing his collection when he received compulsory early retirement. The then by now strapped-for-cash PKP began looking for ways of turning the collection into money. One locomotive was sold to the Lodz City Council for a Holocaust memorial, three more locos were sold to the PSMK for transfer to Skierniewice.


Ty42-9’s tender in primer. Photo ©Robert Dylewski.

Zdunska Wola Town Council made overtures to PKP about taking over the collection and rolling stock only to be told that they could have the skansen on condition that they bought the collection at the market rate! At this stage, some four or five years, ago I became involved… a number of influential friends made representations at the highest level. Suddenly the log jam was cleared and the transfer of the skansen and its remaining rolling stock to the care of the town was approved by the Minister.

Ty45-39’s tender awaits its topcoat, the rest of the loco awaits the ‘full treatment’. Photo ©Robert Dylewski.

Sadly the amount of PKP real estate transferred under the deal is tiny. The ex Gubalowka funicular cars sit on land which still belongs to PKP. The ancient wooden bodied four wheeler carriages have been taken out of their shed (partially shown in the photo of Ty45-39’s tender) where they were kept secure for 20 years and now languish in the open. As soon as the skansen’s transfer to Zdunska Wola was finalised the Town Council submitted an application for an EU assisted project to cosmetically restore the entire collection. Their application rejected because some of the rolling stock was the property of the Railway Museum in Warsaw and proper agreements for their custody in Karsnice were not in place! Undeterred the Council recently announced a tender for the cosmetic restoration of three steam engines and one diesel locomotive. The tender was won by Przemyslaw Krol’s company, Rem-Team. Although work has now ceased for the winter (A fierce snowstorm has hit central Poland.) a vigorous start has been made, as Robert Dylewski’s photos show.

More:

Karsnice Skansen taken over by Zdunska Wola

Thursday, 21 January 2010

PKP hands over Skansen in return for unpaid local taxes

Sign of better times to come? The noticeboard at the entrance to the Karsnice Skansen. One of the ex Gubalowka cable railway coaches can just be seen peeping through the foliage in the background. Photo Marian Maroszek.

(Click above to see more pictures of the Karsnice Skansen on the blog Marian Maroszek – turystycznie…)

Good news for the ‘Forgotten Railway Museum’ at Karsnice. Kolejowa Oficina Wydawnica (The Railway Publishing House) reported on Monday that at long last negotiations between The Town and Municipal Authority of Zdunska Wola and the PKP Estates Department had concluded and that as a result the Authority had acquired a perpetual right to use the railway land, valued at 604,000 zloty (approx. £130,000), occupied by the Skansen. At the same time PKP transferred the ownership of locomotives and rolling stock worth, some 354,000 zloty (approx. £75,000).

The Skansen is the brainchild of one man, Marian Fijolek, the former General Manager of the locomotive repair works at Karsnice. Mr Fijolek set himself the task of collecting one example of every steam locomotive that ever worked on the Magistrala Weglowa (Coal Trunk Line) between Upper Silesia and Gdynia. Mr Fijolek also collected numerous small exhibits, a working model railway and a complete vintage train of ancient four wheel carriages. Other exhibits at Karsnice include a portable steam engine, a giant wheel lathe and the old coaches from the cable-hauled railway on Gubalowka in Zakopane. Sadly all the large exhibits, including the steam locomotives, but not the vintage coaches are – as is common in all Polish railway museums – stored outside in the open.

At its peak Mr Fiolek’s collection included 9 main line steam engines and3 small industrial steam engines. Sadly, during the protracted negotiations, some of the locomotives were sold by PKP and have gone elsewhere, while a number of locomotives are owned by Warsaw Railway Museum which reportedly wants them back! Nevertheless, the exhibits being handed over for safe keeping to the Town Council include 5 steam locomotives (including Ty 42-9, Ty 45-39, Ty 43-1), 3 diesels (SM 41-175, SM 30-39, SM 03-41) and one electric locomotive (ET 21-01).

Let’s hope that under the custody of the Council the decaying locomotives and rolling stock at Karsnice will be properly looked after and that the Skansen will be forgotten no longer.