A Week in Wolsztyn

by

Prior to 1970 Rakonowice was the Western terminus of the Smigiel Railway. Here Ol49-69 waits at Rakoniewice Station in the late afternoon on 29 August 2012. Photo © Christian Cederberg.

(Click to enlarge.)

One of the delights of publishing Behind The Water Tower is receiving photographs for publication from our readers. For several years we have showcased the hauntingly beautiful photographs of the Smigiel Narrow Gauge Railway taken by Marek Ciesielski. Sadly the Smigiel line, as it then was, is no more. It hangs on, as a pale shadow of its former self, cut off from its passenger and freight links to the standard gauge network, little better than a ‘funfair railway’ running a few times each year.

 

An unusual view of the Wolsztyn roundhouse taken through the window of the turntable operator’s cabin on 28 August 2012. Photo © Christian Cederberg.

(Click to enlarge.)

Today we are pleased to feature the photography of Christian Cederberg who lives in Copenhagen and was in Poland for a week at the end of August to photograph the Wolsztyn – Poznan steam services and what other interesting trains he could find.

How long before modernizers and those who ‘do not see the point’ bring about the death of regular steam haulage in Poland? Ol49-59 near Ptaszkowo on 28 August 2012. Photo © Christian Cederberg.

(Click to enlarge.)

In the end, with nothing stirring that week on the Opatowek-Zbiersk section of the Kalisz Narrow Gauge Railway, Christian decided to concentrate his efforts on the Wolsztyn – Poznan line. We think his photographs are magnificent. What do you think?

Ol49-69 at Wolsztyn on the evening 28 August 2012. Photo © Christian Cederberg.

(Click to enlarge.)

Christian is the webmaster of www.damplokomotiv.dk – an archive of colour railway photos from all around the world which is well worth exploring. To see all his photos from this trip in glorious full screen size, just click the link at the very end of this post.

‘Steaming off into the twilight’ – actually an early morning shot, not evening – Ol49-69 between Granowo and Strykowo on 29 August 2012. Photo © Christian Cederberg.

(Click to enlarge.)

More:

Advertisements

One Response to “A Week in Wolsztyn”

  1. Geoff Jenkins Says:

    In the end, with nothing stirring that week on the Opatowek-Zbiersk section of the Kalisz Narrow Gauge Railway, Christian decided to concentrate his efforts on the Wolsztyn – Poznan line.

    It is a great pity that in the last few years freight traffic seems to be coming rather more irregular than it used to be. Latterly the only significant traffic seemed to be stone to Żelazków and in September last year even this appeared to have come to a halt, although hopefully only for a temporary period.

    Nearly a year ago I commented that,

    The Kalisz narrow gauge railway must be the last line in Poland to move standard gauge wagons on transporters. Unfortunately, there are not many reports about what is happening about the freight traffic and when something is mentioned it tends to be about special events. Is there any chance of providing some details about the amount of freight being shifted?

    Dyspozytor kindly responded saying that the Kalisz line was carrying some 60,000 tonnes of freight per year. Is this still the case or have the tonnages fallen? Is the freight overwhelmingly stone or are there still reasonable amounts of other materials being carried? It is always a concern when a line is mainly carrying one type of freight for a single customer. All it takes is a change in policy or trading conditions and the freight could disappear in an instant.

    I’d like to visit again to see the line in operation but it’s a long way to travel on the off chance of seeing trains running. A few years ago if nothing was happening there were other narrow gauge railways in Poland where there was a possibility of seeing something going on. Unfortunately, these have closed or changed into tourist operations. It seems as though I’m going to have to venture further east if I want to see some serious narrow gauge freight.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s