Film competition – part 9

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GWR Castle Class 4-6-0. Still from The Ghost Train.

Our last competition was a little mean. We think a few more BTWT readers would have guessed that the last still was from the 1941 remake of The Ghost Train, if we had used a clip from the shot above. At the start of the film, the train engine – shown running westwards along the seawall at Teignmouth – is either 4084, Aberystwyth Castle, or 4094, Dynevor Castle. The number on the front buffer beam is not altogether clear. Then for  a brief couple of seconds the train engine is shown as a ‘streamlined’ GWR 4-6-0.

It is said that GWR CME, Charles Collet, had been pressurised by the GWR board to try out streamlining. Only two engines were subjected to the treatment – Castle class 5005, Manorbier Castle, and King class 6014, King Henry VII. By the time the film was made, both engines had lost much, though not all, of their streamlined ironmongery. Which of the two engines, the Castle or the King, was used in the film? It is difficult from the rather dark clip to be absolutely sure. Perhaps one of our GWR experts could identify the engine and give his reasons why?

The Ghost Train was originally written as a play by Arnold Ridley and, as such, became a great hit. Ridley was inspired to write it after becoming stranded overnight at Mangotsfield railway station near Bristol. The station was situated on two sides of a a triangle and one of the three routes by-passed the station. The sound of  ‘invisible’ trains apparently passing through the station gave Ridley the inspiration to write the play. The play was filmed many times. Our stills are from the film directed by Walter Forde and released by Gaumont in 1941. The film is a treasure chest of GWR memories. It is available as a DVD through Amazon UK for £6-99.

Ghost Train [DVD] [1941]

The winner of our last round? Gavin Whitelaw, Mark Judd and John Savery submitted corrected answers, but Gavin dashed in first to take the point. The score so far: Mike Winslow and Gavin Whitelaw joint first with 3 points, Alex Fitch and Dyspozytor trailing behind with one point each. A word of warning – so far the going has been relatively easy. Now it’s time bring on our fast bowlers!

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Today’s mystery film. It’s a googly!

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4 Responses to “Film competition – part 9”

  1. Gavin Whitelaw Says:

    I think it may be Man on the Tracks. The loco looks to have Polish plates on possibly is a Tr202. It is a bit of a difficult one as it looks to be taken from inside a loco shed or roundhouse. Not many films use this as a base and narrowing it down is difficult.

    I don’t know that many films using Polish loco sheds as scenes for films so Man on the Tracks it has to be as my best effort to bat the googly. But that may be too easy……..

  2. Mark Judd Says:

    Kolejarskie Slowo

  3. Gavin Whitelaw Says:

    BTW it is a streamlined King in the film still. You can make out the outside springing and axleboxes on the leading bogie wheelset.

  4. Mike Winslow Says:

    Haven’t a clue with this one. Not even sure what type of loco this is. straight frame, small wheels. Is it Turkish? If so, then I really don’t have a clue.

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