Szcesliwego Nowego Roku!

by

(Happy New Year!)

I wish all Behind The Water Tower readers a happy and prosperous 2011. I would also like to thank all our campaigners and contributors and especially: Robert Hall, Marek Ciesielski, Robert Dylewski, Piotr Kumelowski, Inzynier, Podroznik and Prezes.

Dyspozytor

PS. In 2011 look forward to publishing more stories about our successful campaigns. My New Year resolution is to post on BTWT more regularly, although if there is a choice between dashing across the country to try to save a railway line, or publishing a new post on time, the railway will win every time!

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3 Responses to “Szcesliwego Nowego Roku!”

  1. Robert Hall Says:

    Lover though I am of Poland and all things Polish – just occasionally, I feel in tune with the sentiments of a recent poster on a site, dedicated to a completely different subject, which I frequent: “Some languages can’t really be spelled in the Roman alphabet, at least not phonetically. The one that comes to mind, is Polish.” At all events — most heartily, Szcesli… whatever !

    • Dyspozytor Says:

      “Some languages can’t really be spelled in the Roman alphabet, at least not phonetically. The one that comes to mind, is Polish.”

      This is not strictly true. Polish has a very strict phonetic spelling and nearly all its sounds occur in somewhere in English or French.

      Thus –

      Szczęśliwego is:
      Sz as the sh in shoot
      cz as the ch in church
      ę as the ain in aint it?
      ś as the ch in chien (F.)
      li as the ly in happily
      w as the letter v
      eg as egg
      o as the o in hot

      Nowego is:
      Now as the Nov in November
      eg as egg
      o as the o in hot

      Roku is:
      rok as rock
      u as the oo in look

      The phonetic rules are different to those used in English, but once learnt the pronunciation of Polish words should not cause too much problems to an English speaker.

  2. Robert Hall Says:

    Agreed, the words of the poster on the site, as quoted, are something of a libel ! While basically aware of the logical and consistent spelling rules in Polish, occasionally I can’t help boggling at something seen written in the language.

    Had better not risk becoming contentious by getting into the merits or otherwise, of the Cyrillic script. Anyhow, that is of course tied to religion — only Eastern Orthodox types use it !

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